Why God, Why? (A poem for the heavy heart) | Writing Exercise

Why God

Writing exercise: Wax philosophical.

My friend’s nephew was mugged by four men in the Philippines. They brutally beat him in the head with a hammer. He died from his injuries a few days later. He was only 21.

Life is full of unanswered questions. Today’s writing exercise is to create dissonance and resolution. Those terms are typically used in music composition, and it’s what gives those musical moments we love so much such power.

It’s about creating tension then providing relief. But in this exercise, I wanted to take it further than writing a who-done-it then revealing who-did-it.

I love asking questions that take the mind deeper. The entertainment is the sugar, the underlying questions are the medicine.

So, get philosophical. Take a current event that seems “answerless”–whether personal, or in the news–and immerse yourself in that question (the dissonance), but then rise to the surface with a possible a way out, or a little hope (the resolution).

Good luck, and happy writing!

Why God, Why?

Why God, why? Is a question we ask often
As we look upon the innocent draped in their coffin.
When disaster strikes, why doesn’t He stop it?
If he created the world, why sit back and drop it?

When he sees us crestfallen, why doesn’t He care?
If he sees what is coming, why does He stand there
Just watching us suffer as we clean up the rubble
Of the storms in our lives that give us all trouble?

Why God, why? is the phrase we all ask
To this God who’s in hiding unwilling to unmask
His purpose behind what is making us sad.
If he’s the Great God of Good, then why is there bad?

Why are the answers always unsatisfying
Amid all the disease, all the heartbreaks, the lying?
Well, maybe that question is not our biggest problem
As we sift through life’s puzzles finding some way to solve them.

Maybe, if we stop asking in the Spirit of accusation
And instead ask “Why God?” in the form of supplication,
Then the heavens might open to this God you once knew
And answer your “Why God” as he weeps there with you.

 


The Tale of Nottingswood cover JR YoungA Novelette by JR Young. Experience the dystopian upside-down town of Nottingswood. Visit Nottingswood.com and read the first 28 pages of JR’s latest novelette, The Tale of Nottingswood, for free. Available now in print. Get the eBook on iBooks, NookKobo, and all other formats, including Kindle, right here.

Don’t forget to follow JR on Facebook.

Click here to join JR on Goodreads for Q&A’s, quotes and more. Read his interview with Smashwords here.

Advertisements

The Shame of the Fallen | A Writing Exercise

The Journey by David Shauf

Writing exercise: One syllable prompt

For today’s writing exercise, I used a prompt that challenged me to write using only words with one syllable. Challenge accepted.

1. Poem

Step by each step they climbed.
With wings of faith they flew.
High did they fly
‘Til their face touched the sky
And found peace with those friends they once knew.

2. Story – The Shame of the Fallen

George stepped down from his place on the stand. With a twinge of regret lodged in his throat, he did not speak as they all watched him pass by.

What will he say?” they thought. “What will he do?

As he found the door at the back of the room, he paused, looked back, and with a tear in his eye and shame on his brow, he said,

“Don’t lose your faith. I will not be back. Another will take my place to keep you on track.”

Then he was gone.

The hush was thick in the air of that room, and no one saw or heard from their priest again.


Now it’s your turn. Write something using only one syllable words and post it, or a link to it, in the comments.


The Tale of Nottingswood cover JR YoungA Novelette by JR Young. Experience the dystopian upside-down town of Nottingswood. Visit Nottingswood.com and read the first 28 pages of JR’s latest novelette, The Tale of Nottingswood, for free. Available now in print. Get the eBook on iBooks, NookKobo, and all other formats, including Kindle, right here.

Don’t forget to follow JR on Facebook.

Click here to join JR on Goodreads for Q&A’s, quotes and more. Read his interview with Smashwords here.

In the Grasp Of the Scythe

Poem about death

Today’s writing exercise: Writing what comes.

Reading all the news reports about the deadly terror attacks in Paris, my heart was heavy and my fingers twitchy. Twitchy to empty myself of the weight in my head and swelling in my chest. Not sure if what came out makes sense; there is no specific rhyming pattern or meter, but it was what my heart wanted to say. Continue reading

The Curse of The Redlined

Writing exercise: Rhyming 

How does a joke turn into something amazing? This is how:

My songwriting buddy, Chris, came down for a visit over the holiday. One morning, we busted out two songs in an hour and a half! He emailed me this morning asking me to send him one of the verses we had rewritten.

As good friends do, we joke with one another over email, but my joke turned into something different.

After two decades of writing songs, my mind tends to think in verse when I create. (Evidenced by the nearly 15,000 word novelette, The Tale of Nottingswood, written entirely in verse. Read the first 28 pages for yourself here.)

I used to have a “purist” attitude about my writing. I believed the only resource that a writer should have at their disposal is their mind. It wasn’t until I read an interview with my favorite composer and lyricist, Stephen Sondheim, that my eyes were opened.

He admitted to using a rhyming dictionary.

GASP!

Continue reading